Literary Terms

studied byStudied by 2 people
0.0(0)
get a hint
hint

Allegory

1 / 127

encourage image

There's no tags or description

Looks like no one added any tags here yet for you.

128 Terms

1

Allegory

A story, poem that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one. The story occurs on both a symbolic and a literal level. Ex: Animal Farm

New cards
2

The Chronicles of Narnia. The lion, Aslan, represents a Christ character, who is the rightful ruler of the kingdom of Narnia. Aslan sacrifices himself for Edmund, the Judas figure, and is resurrected to rule over Narnia once again. Biblical allegory can also refer to allegorical interpretations of the Bible, which differ from literal interpretations, and were popular in the Middle Ages.

Allegory

New cards
3

Allegory of the Cave. In this story, Plato imagines people living in a cave, only ever seeing objects as shadows reflected on the wall from the light of a fire—rather than seeing the objects directly. Plato used the cave as a symbolic representation of how humans live in the world, contrasting reality versus our interpretation of it.

Allegory

New cards
4

Animal Farm: In this farm fable, animals run a society that divides into factions and mirrors the rise of Leon Trotsky and the Russian Revolution. The story can be read as a fable of farm animals running a society, or it can be interpreted as the author’s criticism of communism.

Allegory

New cards
5

The Scarlet Letter: Hester Prynne is forced to undergo public humiliation, including wearing the scarlet letter “A” (standing for “adultress”) after she becomes pregnant out of wedlock. The scarlet letter is itself an allegorical representation of sin, and how society punishes it. The novel can be read as a criticism of the hypocrisy of a Puritanical society.

Allegory

New cards
6

Anecdote

A brief narrative or a retelling of a story or event often based on the speaker’s own experience. Ex: When a teacher is telling students not to plagiarize and tells a story about a time a student did just that and describe the consequences.

New cards
7

Back in my day I had to walk three miles to the watering hole just to brush my teeth.

Anecdote

New cards
8

I had a friend who smoked a cigarette once. Now she’s in jail for tax evasion.

Anecdote

New cards
9

Apostrophe

An address – usually poetic – to an inanimate object or to someone not present. Ex: “O, Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?”

New cards
10

“Sylvan historian, who canst thus express / A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme”

Apostrophe

New cards
11

“Death, be not proud, though some have called thee / Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so.”

Apostrophe

New cards
12

“Oh! Stars and clouds and winds, ye are all about to mock me; if ye really pity me, crush sensation and memory; let me become as naught; but if not, depart, depart, and leave me in darkness.”

Apostrophe

New cards
13

Genre

A particular literary category – novels, poems, plays

New cards
14

Drama – Stories composed in verse or prose, usually for theatrical performance, where conflicts and emotion are expressed through dialogue and action.

Genre

New cards
15

Folklore – The songs, stories, myths, and proverbs of a people or "folk" as handed down by word of mouth.

Genre

New cards
16

Satire

A literary work in which the ideas, customs, behaviors or institutions of society are ridiculed to effect change. Ranged from mild to harsh. Irony and exaggeration are the main weapons.

New cards
17

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain (1884), pokes fun at religion, for instance, with the feud between the Grangerfods and Shepardsons.

Satire

New cards
18

A Modest Proposal (1729), by Jonathan Swift. This essay suggested eating babies to solve famine in Ireland. It was intended to mock the heartless attitudes of the rich towards the poor and also the way in which some genuine proposals seemed to regard the poor as commodities.

Satire

New cards
19

Brave New World (1932); Aldous Huxley – This dystopian science fiction novel has a futuristic society that exaggerates and satirizes elements of the real world: Huxley imagined how a highly state-controlled futuristic world might look. It depicts conformity, a caste system with genetically engineered babies, and a drugged, compliant population.

Satire

New cards
20

Stock

A common stereotypical character who occurs frequently in literature. Ex: Mad scientists, scarred veterans

New cards
21

Absent-minded Professor

Stock

New cards
22

Wicked Stepmother

Stock

New cards
23

Round/Dynamic

Characters are portrayed in great depth and are given more generous details. These tend to develop over the course of the story. Ex: Lady Macbeth – Beginning wants her husband to murder for power; by the end she is overcome with regret.

New cards
24

Walter White (Breaking Bad) exhibits complex dimensions to his personality and he changes significantly over the course of the series.

Round/Dynamic Characterization

New cards
25

Hamlet (Hamlet) is worried about life and death. The greatest fear of Hamlet is the afterlife, which is quite understandable, because his father’s Ghost comes out of purgatory and tells him about the horror and terror awaiting there. Because of his preoccupation with this fear, Hamlet does not act out on his desire to take vengeance on Claudius. Nevertheless, when he visits the graveyard, and holds Yorick’s dead skull, he becomes apprehensive of the inevitability of death. Hamlet thinks that even great men, such as Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar, could not escape it. This philosophical change in his perspective about death lets him finally take revenge on King Claudius.

Round/Dynamic Characterization

New cards
26

Foil Characterization

Characters that stand in contrast to the main character. Ex: Alec and Angel to Tess in Tess of the d'Urbervilles

New cards
27

Frankenstein (Mary Shelley) – Victor Frankenstein shuts himself off from others, driven by his obsession to create a living being. As a result, he creates a creature who craves companionship and connection, exhibiting the human characteristics that Frankenstein lacks.

Foil Characterization

New cards
28

Romeo and Juliet(Shakespeare) – While Romeo is a whimsical lover, Mercutio doesn’t see the big deal. In fact, he’s skeptical of love. Romeo is anything but, and it shows. Mercutio’s “whatever” attitude works to show the depth of Romeo’s feelings.

Foil Characterization

New cards
29

Epiphany

A moment of insight, discovery or revelation by which a character or a character’s life is altered. Ex: Macbeth realizes his false security

New cards
30

Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury) – Guy Montag has lived his life going through the motions. As a firefighter in this post-apocalyptic society, he has mindlessly burned books without questioning. This continues until he realizes that books are not the enemy.

Epiphany

New cards
31

In the middle of a typical argument with his wife, a man realizes he has been the one causing every single argument, and that in order to keep his marriage, he must stop being such an aggressive person.

Epiphany

New cards
32

Flat/Static Characterization

A character with only one outstanding characteristic trait or quality. They remain the same throughout the novel. Ex: Crush in Finding Nemo

New cards
33

The main antagonist of Peter Pan, Captain Hook is a cruel and buffoonish pirate captain who remains cruel and buffoonish throughout the story, ultimately being bested by Peter Pan. He never significantly changes or learns any lessons.

Static Characterization

New cards
34

Sherlock Holmes – The famous detective undergoes no significant interval changes throughout any of the Arthur Conan Doyle stories—Holmes continuously regards the world with the same witty, confident attitude, even after encountering serious conflicts.

Static Characterization

New cards
35

Captain America – While there are a lot of different versions of the Captain America story with varying levels of staticism, overall the character remains the same: he begins and ends the story as a moral person who wants to help others and serve his country. Even though he undergoes significant external changes, his internal traits remain the same.

Static Characterization

New cards
36

Archetype

Recurring symbol, character or landscape that is viewed as common to many cultures.

New cards
37

The Damsel in Distress - The hero rescues her

Archetype

New cards
38

Battle of Good and Evil - Good ultimately triumphs

Archetype

New cards
39

The Garden - Symbolizes love and fertility

Archetype

New cards
40

Objective POV

Camera Angle; Reader is in the position of the speaker; Reader must draw their own conclusions about what is occurring; All that is related is what characters say and do; Feelings/emotional states must be inferred; Purest form would be dialogue only

New cards
41

"He watched from a distance as the police officer questioned the subject," the author uses third person objective to describe what is happening in the story but he does not reveal the inner thoughts and feelings of the characters.

Objective POV

New cards
42

“Hansel walked ahead of Gretel. Gretel dropped breadcrumbs behind her as she went.

Objective POV

New cards
43

Ahead of them, an old witch waited.”

Objective POV

New cards
44

Stream of Consciousness

Seeks to depict how we think; Flow of inner experiences. Procession of unrelated images and ideas.

New cards
45

I continue to live inside a dichotomy: what was and what shall be. The pain in my skull is me trying to mesh the two.

Stream of Consciousness

New cards
46

“I am I and you are you and I know it and you don't know it and you could do so much for me if you just would and if you just would then I could tell you and then nobody would have to know it except you and me and Darl”

Stream of Consciousness

New cards
47

Omniscient

All knowing; Most flexible point of view; Permits widest scope - allows for depth and breadth; Inside the minds of all characters; Interprets and comments

New cards
48

“As the campers settled into their tents, Zara hoped her eyes did not betray her fear, and Lisa silently wished for the night to quickly end.”

Omniscient

New cards
49

“He had no way of knowing that things were about to get much worse.” Or: “Waiting for her around the corner was the killer, looking for his tenth victim.”

Omniscient

New cards
50

Limited Omniscient

Story told from the perspective of one character. The narrator comments on the story’s events from the character’s perspective. The narrator informs the reader of what the character thinks and feels and comments on the character as the narrator knows more about the character than the character may know about themselves.

New cards
51

“Marcus warily took one more glance at his mom, unable to read the look on her face, before heading to school.” The narrator is experiencing the action through the experience of one character, whose thoughts and feelings are closely held.

Limited Omniscient

New cards
52

“Dumbledore opened his mouth to speak and then closed it again. Fawkes the phoenix let out a low, soft, musical cry. To Harry’s intense embarrassment, he suddenly realized that Dumbledore’s bright blue eyes looked rather watery, and stared hastily at his own knee.

Limited Omniscient

New cards
53

First Person

Story told from the perspective of one character – this character is the narrator; can be a major or minor character i.e. participant of observer; as the story is told from the only one perspective - the reliability of the narrator must always be questioned; allows for immediacy, dramatic irony, human error; be wary of the “authorial fallacy”

New cards
54

My heart leaped into my throat as I turned and saw a frightening shadow.

First Person

New cards
55

There are places I'll remember / All my life, though some have changed / Some forever, not for better / Some have gone and some remain. / All these places had their moments / With lovers and friends / I still can recall / Some are dead and some are living In my life, / I've loved them all.

First Person

New cards
56

Flashback

A scene in a movie, novel, etc., set in a time earlier than the main story

New cards
57

A woman is about to get married. As she puts on her veil, she remembers her fiancé three years before, swearing he would make her his wife someday. A tear comes to her eye and she prepares to walk down the aisle.

Flashback

New cards
58

The backfiring of the bus sent the older man spiraling back to his youth. He could hear the guns firing and his comrades shouting. Adrenaline rushed through him, taking his breath. Leaning against the sign for the bus stop, he covered his ears trying to staunch the flow of memories.

Flashback

New cards
59

Foreshadowing

A warning or indication of a future event

New cards
60

“My life were better ended by their hate, than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.”

Foreshadowing

New cards
61

“On December the third the wind changed overnight and it was winter.” “The birds had been more restless than ever this fall of the year. Their agitation more remarked because the days were still.”

Foreshadowing

New cards
62

Abstract

Referring to a word that signifies a general idea, concept or condition that is intangible. Ex: Truth, beauty, democracy

New cards
63

‘Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, but bears it out even to the edge of doom’

Abstract

New cards
64

A thing of beauty is a joy forever

Abstract

New cards
65

Colloquialism

Words and phrases used in casual conversation and given new, informal meanings. Could originate from a dialect, but does not have to. Ex: Y’all, wicked pissa

New cards
66

It’s wicked good – It pleases me

Colloquialism

New cards
67

Ballpark – Something that is close but not exact

Colloquialism

New cards
68

Concrete

A word that specifies what is tangible; a word whose meaning we understand with one or more of our five senses. Ex: Desk, chair, frozen

New cards
69

I ate an apple

Concrete

New cards
70

I understand that you believe you are correct, but you are missing a necessary piece of information.

Concrete

New cards
71

Connotation

The implied or understood meaning of a word that is more than or different from its definition. Ex: “She is feeling blue.”

New cards
72

Stench, smell, aroma, scent, odor.

Connotation

New cards
73

Broke, poor, impoverished

Connotation

New cards
74

Denotation

Dictionary definition.

New cards
75

The boy was pushy. (He was literally pushing people.)

Denotation

New cards
76

The dog is a mutt

Denotation

New cards
77

Diction

The specific word choice the author/narrator/speaker employs

New cards
78

“I will address that issue right away.” vs. , “You got it.”

Diction

New cards
79

Anaphora

The exact repetition of the first few words or phrases at the beginning of successive sentences or clauses. Ex: ”Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama. Go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia…”

New cards
80

Stay safe. Stay well. Stay happy

Anaphora

New cards
81

Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.

Anaphora

New cards
82

Repetition

Repeated words or phrases. Ex: I love bats; I love cats; I love worms = EMPHASIS

New cards
83

Oh, woeful, oh woeful, woeful, woeful day

Repetition

New cards
84

Nory was a Catholic because her mother was a Catholic, and Nory’s mother was a Catholic because her father was a Catholic, and her father was a Catholic because his mother was a Catholic, or had been.

Repetition

New cards
85

Cataloging

A list. Ex: The air was filled with the smell of car emissions, burnt leaves, septic=tank stench, festering garbage, dead cat, putrid vomit.

New cards
86

“Glory be to God for dappled things – / For skies of couple-color as a brinded cow; / For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim; / Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches’ wings; / Landscape plotted and pieced – fold, fallow, and plough; / And áll trádes, their gear and tackle and trim.”

Cataloging

New cards
87

Our grapes fresh from the vine, / Pomegranates full and fine, / Dates and sharp bullaces, / Rare pears and greengages, / Damsons and bilberries, / Taste them and try: / Currants and gooseberries, / Bright-fire-like barberries.

Cataloging

New cards
88

Juxtaposition

The placement of words or phrases next to or near each other for effect. Ex: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness…”

New cards
89

All's fair in love and war

Juxtaposition

New cards
90

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I- / I took the one less traveled by, / And that has made all the difference.

Juxtaposition

New cards
91

Caesura

A pause/interruption/break near the middle of a line. Often emphasizes what follows. Ex: The hallway was silent – except for the creak of the floorboards.

New cards
92

To be or not to be – that is the question

Caesura

New cards
93

Death, || only death, can break the lasting chain

Caesura

New cards
94

Allusion

A reference to a historical event, a literary work, biblical story/character, etc. Ex: The butterfly is my Achilles heel in swim meets.

New cards
95

Then leaf subsides to leaf. / So Eden sank to grief, / So dawn goes down to day. / Nothing gold can stay.

Allusion

New cards
96

He's a cool guy, but he becomes a lovesick Romeo every time he's around her.

Allusion

New cards
97

Analogy

An extended comparison between two Unlike things that share some similarities. It is similar to an extended metaphor and simile but the difference lies in the fact that this comparison has similarities. Ex: My experience at the periodontist was like being in a medieval torture chamber. The dental implements looked like instruments of torture and the pain I felt was like being stretched on teh rack.

New cards
98

As cold waters to a thirsty soul, / So is good news from a far country

Analogy

New cards
99

Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player / That struts and frets his hour upon the stage / And then is heard no more. It is a tale / Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, / Signifying nothing

Analogy

New cards
100

Hyperbole

Exaggeration. Ex: I was so thirsty; I could have drunk the entire lake.

New cards

Explore top notes

note Note
studied byStudied by 1 person
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
note Note
studied byStudied by 11 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
note Note
studied byStudied by 214 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(2)
note Note
studied byStudied by 39 people
Updated ... ago
4.0 Stars(1)
note Note
studied byStudied by 12 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
note Note
studied byStudied by 5 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
note Note
studied byStudied by 12 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
note Note
studied byStudied by 6 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)

Explore top flashcards

flashcards Flashcard32 terms
studied byStudied by 1 person
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
flashcards Flashcard61 terms
studied byStudied by 53 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(2)
flashcards Flashcard52 terms
studied byStudied by 9 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
flashcards Flashcard296 terms
studied byStudied by 4 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
flashcards Flashcard51 terms
studied byStudied by 83 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
flashcards Flashcard48 terms
studied byStudied by 33 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
flashcards Flashcard20 terms
studied byStudied by 21 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)
flashcards Flashcard49 terms
studied byStudied by 14 people
Updated ... ago
5.0 Stars(1)