NUTR 202 Module 2: Think Before You Eat PPT

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What does a healthy diet consist of?

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Health

48 Terms

1

What does a healthy diet consist of?

variety, balance, and moderation

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2

Variety

eating different types of foods within each food group

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3

Balance

incorporating foods from all food groups into daily plan; balancing calories consumed with calories expended during physical activity

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4

Moderation

avoiding overconsumption of any food or food group (portion sizes)

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5

Nutrient density

nutrient content of food relative to its calories

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6

Empty calories

calories that have little or no nutrient content

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7

Dietary Guidelines for Americans

-published every 5 years since 1980 by HHS and USDA -Recommendations on diet and lifestyle to reduce disease risk for people 2+ y/o -last published in 2015

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8

2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

-focus on adaptable, nutrient-dense, eating patterns -addresses diet quality and physical activity to manage weight and reduce chronic disease risk -encourage getting nutrients from food and not supplements

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9

What are the 5 healthy patterns of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans?

-variety of fruits, veggies, whole grains -fat free or low fat dairy -variety of protein sources -oils -physical activity

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10

What healthy patterns are limited in 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans?

-saturated or trans fats (solid fats) and added sugars (SoFAS) -sodium or salt

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11

Fortified foods

foods with nutrients added to them ex: calcium fortified orange juice

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12

Enriched foods

nutrients are added back that were removed during processing ex: enriched white rice has some B-vitamins and iron added back -Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Folate, and Iron

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13

What is Healthy People 2020?

-set of government objectives including dietary and health goals targeted at improving overall health of U.S. population -42 topic areas and 1200+ objectives -created by collaborative effort by scientists, federal and state agencies, and public feedback

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14

What are the primary goals of Healthy People 2020?

-increase quality of life through better health for all life stages -eliminate health disparities -create social and physical environments that promote good health

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15

What are the top listed objectives of Healthy People 2020?

nutrition, physical activity, and obesity

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16

Dietary Reference Intakes

Food and Nutrition board published dietary reference standards called Recommended Dietary Allowances (DRA) for specific nutrients in 1941 : calories, protein, vitamin A, vitamin D, thiamin, niacin, vitamin C, calcium, and iron

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17

What was the original intent of RDA's?

maintain health and prevent deficiencies

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18

What are the new standards of Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs)?

designed for healthy people and are categorized by age group and life stage Includes: Estimated Average Requirement (EAR), RDA, Adequate Intake (AI), Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL)

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19

How do DRIs assess and improve the nutritional status of Americans?

-interpret food consumption records of populations -establish standards for food assistance programs and plan school menus -establish guidelines for nutrition labeling

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20

What is the Estimated Average Requirement and why is it important?

-value assigned to a nutrient that would meet the needs of 50% of people of a specific age or life stage -used by federal agencies for research and policy making

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21

What is Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) and why is it important?

-recommended intake required to meet daily nutrient needs for 97-98% of individuals -used for diet planning and is foundation of DRI

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22

What is Adequate Intake (AI) and why is it important?

-value assigned to a nutrient is some scientific evidence is available but not enough to establish a recommendation with certainty -used to make recommendations for healthy people for nutrients with no RDA and also to calculate nutritional requirement for infants

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23

What is Upper Intake Level (UL) and why is it important?

-highest level of daily nutrient intake that poses little risk of adverse health effects to healthy individuals -established in response to potential toxic levels of nutrients being consumed

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24

Estimated Energy Requirement (EER)

general recommendation for hoe many calories a person should consume in a day

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25

What are the influencing factors of Estimated Energy Requirement?

age, gender, height, weight, level of physical activity

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26

Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range (AMDR)

recommendations for amount of calories from carbohydrates, fats, and proteins

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27

What is the goal of acceptable macronutrient distribution range?

balance nutrient intake and reduce the risk of chronic conditions

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28

MyPlate

-USDA daily plan for food intake -replaced old food guide MyPyramid in 2011

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29

What are the 5 food groups distributed on the MyPlate icon?

veggies, fruits, grains, dairy, and protein

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30

SuperTracker

allows you to enter personalized info to receive an individualized meal plan and number of servings from each food group

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31

What is the purpose of MyPlate?

-personalized meal plan -meet DRIs -emphasize variety, moderation, and balance

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32

What are the 2 federal agencies that issue regulations for contents of food labels?

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Food Safety and Inspection Service of the USDA

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33

What does the FDA regulate?

food labeling required for most packaged foods

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34

What does the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the USDA regulate?

labeling of meat, poultry, and fresh eggs

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35

What is the Nutrition Facts label?

-describes nutritional content of food products -required on food labels (some foods exempt) -can assist with meal planning

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36

What is the serving size on the nutrition facts label?

1st place to start; standardized for product comparison

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37

What are the calories on the nutrition facts label?

amount of calories listed in one serving as indicated on label

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38

Nutrients on nutrition facts label

-Grouped by those to consume less of: fat, total fat, cholesterol, and sodium -Grouped by those to consume more of: dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, and iron

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39

Daily values on nutrition facts label:

-nutrient standards used on food labels -based on 2000 kcal diet, % met in 1 serving

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40

What % is considered high and low in food product?

5% or less= low 20% or more= high

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41

Label claims

FDA established guidelines that manufacturers must follow to make certain claims on their food labels

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42

What are the 3 categories of label claims?

-health claims -nutrient content claims -structure/function claims

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43

Health Claims

statements made about a product that link it or its ingredients to a reduced risk of disease (must be FDA approved)

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44

What are the 3 categories of health claims?

-Authorized Health Claims: supported by extensive scientific evidence and experts in the scientific community -Qualified Health Claims: supported by scientific body of experts and based on emerging scientific evidence -Authoritative Health Claims: claims backed and requested by body of scientific experts with the U.S. government or the National Academy of Sciences

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45

Structure/Function claims

-commonly seen on dietary supplements -describe association between a nutrient or food component and the structure/function in the body -must include disclaimer on label

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46

What is the main difference between health claims and structure/function claims?

structure/function claims do not need to be preapproved by the FDA

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47

Nutrient Content Claims

claims approved by the FDA that describe the level of a nutrient in a food item

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48

What are some examples of nutrient content claims?

-"free" -"low" -"lean" or "extra lean" -"high" -"good source" -"reduced" or "less"

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