Vocab AP lang

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Automaton

n. something which has the power of spontaneous motion or self improvement robotic or robotic individual Bender, a famous automaton from Furturama, is known for being crass. Wall-e

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Voracious

adj. consuming or eager to consume great amounts of (food), ravenous (super hungry) Having or marked by an insatiable appetite for a pursuit or activity The teacher said she was a voracious reader, collecting over 1,000 books Spirited Away - pig

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Indiscriminate

adj. done at random or without distinction or thought haphazard thrown together the teacher was indiscriminate in placing students in groups, picking at random without much thinking lottery

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Eminent

adj. Famous and respected within a particular sphere or profession emphasizing prominence well-known for something positive Dr. MLK Jr. is an eminent civil rights advocate, who even has a national holiday in his honor Albert Einstein

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Steep

v. to soak in a liquid at a temperature under boiling point to immerse or submerge oneself completely in something (concept) I usually steep myself in music when studying, so that it blocks out everything else and I can concentrate better. music

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Replete

adj. filled with something; fully supplied with something The book was replete with action and excitement Costco

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Abound

v. to be present in large numbers or in great quantity The was a mall with numerous stores and material objects abound inside popcorn

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Technology

n. the practical application of knowledge, especially in a particular area equipment or structures created from specific purposes Iphones are the best examples of technology because you can almost do anything with them and they are incredibly entertaining. Iphone

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Prognosticate

v. to prophesize: to predict; to foretell; to forecast The weather man prognosticated that it was going to rain tomorrow Magic 8 ball

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Matron

n. a married woman, especially a dignified and sober (outstanding) middle aged one a woman with power and authority a respected older woman in a family or organization Britain's most well-known mantron, Queen Elizabeth II, recently passed. Mom

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Realm

n. A kingdom region or domain: an area of expertise a field, sphere, or province The king looked over his large realm, barely weeing the edge of the region Hogwarts, Pixie Hollow

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Paradox

n. A contradiction: a thing that at first seems confusing or impossible but is rational: an apparent impossibility: two truths that exist at the same time, ut seem to contradict each other

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Annals

n. A history: a complete history: a chronicle or archive: a recorded history The library had ancient Egyptian annals in it. books, History Museum

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Tinge

n. A tract of colour; a tiny amount; a hint of something The flower had a pink tinge to it

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Compound

v. to form by combining parts; to increase in severity; to make sose through addition My stress over school was compounded by my stress for work cause and effect, fracture

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Badger

v. To harass or annoy persistently; to repeated ask or demand The boy liked to badger the girl at recess by throwing sand and pulling her hair every day. Siblings, "not touching you", are we there yet?

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Implore

v. to call or pray for earnestly; to ask or beg for something I had to implore my mom to take me to Disneyland puppy-dog eyes, quivering lip, pleeeeese!

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Drudgery

n. tiresome or menial work He hated the drudgery of his work chores, dishes

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Interminable

adj. Having or seeming to have no end' drawn on for a long time The man's 30 year prison sentence felt interminable prison, youtube ads you can't skip, waiting for new season

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Perceive

v. to see, hear and the like with understanding; to apprehend mentally; to come to understanding she perceived a change in her friends attitude because she was being unusually quiet reading people, art, body language

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Hapless

adj. Luckless; unfortunate The hapless person always has the most unfortunate events happen to them Memory: luckless coin

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Laconic

adj. Being concise to the point of seeming rude or mysterious using a minimum of words They become very laconic when angry or sad, shutting down almost completely. The lacronic man confused the class of kids when answering the questions so briefly Memory: yes/no, passive aggressive

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Throng

n. A large group or mob of people He pushed his way through the throng at the concert. There was a trong of middle schoolers laughing at me. They soon stopped Memory: Assemblies, school hallway, minions

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Intrepid

adj. Fearless or adventurous the intrepid reporter took another step towards the caution tape at the crime scene, but did not cross Memory: skydivers, climbers on Everest

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Irate

adj. to be extremely angry: to be excessively pissed off The irate owner, stormed to their table and kicked them out Memory: Angry emoji

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Accost

v. To approach or address someone boldly and aggressively to stop someone and yell at them The bully accosted the nerd because he wanted the answers to the math quiz Memory: "Karens", bullies, cops, parents

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Reticent

adj. Inclined to be silent or uncommunicative in speech Restrained in expression, presentation and/or appearance unwilling to speak The reticent child never participated in class discussions Memory: Social Anxiety, human statue

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Furtive

adj. Sly, secretive, done with stealth Actions done in a way that seems deceitful; sneaky With a furtive motion, he put his phone down beneath the desk, but I could still tell that he was testing in class Memory: Heist, stealing, shoplifting

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Felon

n. A person who has committed a serious crime/felony A person who has been convicted of a serious crime The felon entered the prison, charged with four counts of murder Memory: Jack the Ripper, Death Row

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Plethora

n. A large amount and variety of something A wide variety of something I have a plethora of pants, so I will donate some. Memory: clothes, markers

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Enhance

v. Alter, raise, to add or contribute to, to make better, to improve The color gold enhances everyone's beauty Memory: Cop shows with images (zoomed in), makeup, my awesome shirt

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Pretext

n. an excuse; a pretense A reason given that hides the real intentions someone has Vladimir Putin used the fabricated pretext of needing to rid the country of Nazis in order to invade Ukraine. Memory: I overslept, My dog at my homework, I didn't study, excuses

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Fabricate

v. To invent or concoct with deceitful intent to make up a lie When my mother asked where I was, I quickly fabricated a lie about being at my friends house Memory: Pinocchio, McCarthy

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Adroit

adj. dexterous, skillful; clever or skilled physically or mentally Bob was adroit at driving, being able to turn on a dime Memory: Speed cubing, cup stacking, bus driving competition

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Gesticulate

v. to make gestures while speaking to say or express with gestures The advocate gesticulated during the speech, emphasizing almost every word with his hands. Memory: sign language, mimies, silent movies

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Vigilant

adj. keeping careful watch for danger or difficulties watchful, on guard, alert A good lifeguard is vigilant, always looking for downing kids. Memory: lifeguard, batman, security

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Avid

adj. showing a keen interest in or enthusiasm for something Eager and ready The avid reader read a lot of books. Memory: Adult Disney fans, Fanboys

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Cajole

v. to get one's way through delusive flattery to manipulate through flattery to convince through kind words and compliments The unfaithful man was able to cajole his irate wife against divorce.

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Rudimentary

adj. consisting of first principles imperfectly developed; basic; janky simple and not refined A tent is a rudimentary form of sheltor Memory: 1+1=2, duct tape, fire

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Naunce

n. A subtle difference, shade of meaning, expression or sound The chef can nuance of flavour in a dish Memory: reticent vs. laconic

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Jostle

v. to come in rough contact while moving; push and shove to make one's way by pushing He jostled through the throng to the bar, to quickly grab a drink. Memory: hallways, mosh pits, bumpy carriages

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Inadvertent

adj. not duly attentive; marked by unintentional lack of care accidental, not down on purpose The student had an inadvertent trip in the hallway and fell over. Memory: fail compilations, Oops!

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Loathe

v. to intensely dislike or have a hatred for I don't dislike many people, but I loathe him after he spilled his drink on me Memory: Teachers who give too much homework, people who chew with their mouth open

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Reprimand

v. to criticize angrily: to correct verbally for wrong doing The father reprimanded his daughter for driving too fast and getting a speeding ticket. Memory, My dad when I talk back, getting a warning

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lackluster

adj. ordinary or dull, not impressive, boring The performance of the symphony was not good, it was lackluster Memory: Thinking of cluse for the work, orchestra concerts

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Caustic

adj. eating away by chemical action, sarcastic, biting, cruel, hurtful His caustic remarks about my outfit made me feel really self conscious Memory: toxic people, evil step mother

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Wrest

v. to gain by great difficulty or violence, by force to take by force, to pull away or grab harshly slowly but surely Ukraine has been about to wrest its' territory back from Russia. Memory: too few controllers, My TURN!

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Infamous

adj. famous because of something bad Ted Bundy is an infamous serial killer, known by many for having killed women. Memory: Jack the Ripper

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Dupe

n. a victim or deception, a fool; someone easily fooled or tricked He was well-known by the scammers as a dupe, someone who would fork over all his money. Memory: Tom & Jerry, Rowley - Diary of the Wimpy Kid

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Incipient

adj. beginning; in an initial stage, just starting The robot in an in incipient stage, consisting only of wheels and motors. Memory: babies, caterpillars, first try

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Bristle

v. to rise or stand stiffly. to be angered or react angrily to something The man bristled when I asked him to move. Memory: toothbrush, porcupine, parents

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Ominous

adj. An impression that something bad is going to happen a feeling of impending doom The onset of something negative There was a an ominous silence as she walked along at night. Memory: complete silence from wildlife, black cat, creepy music

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Tremulous

adj. Trembling;shaking and fragile Bob was tremulous at the sight of the scary bear. Memory: spiders, old rope bridge

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Repudiate

v. to reject of validity or authority or something. to refuse to be associated with something. to refuse The ideas of enlightenment cause early American colonists to repudiate the British Government. Memory: Flat earthers, birds aren't real

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Cessation

n. to stop an activity: a halting The cessation of war between two countries brought peace. Memory: red light, stop sign. heart rate monitor flat line

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Euphemism

n. The substitution of an agreeable or inoffensive expression for one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant a softer way of saying something harsh or socially unaccepted The teacher pretended to be duped by the students' euphemism as they continued their furtive laughter. Memory: Birds and bees, the stork, in a better place

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Mundane

adj. lacking interest or excitement; ordinary; common He volunteered for the mundane task of cleaning tables. Memory: chores, school, homework

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Incongruous

adj. not matching; not appropriate to the situation; out of place The girl showed up to soccer practice in an incongruous outfit, only wearing a dress and heels. Memory: laughing at a funeral, clashing

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Condolence

n. expression of sorrow I said my condolences to my friend whose parent passed away (She said using an euphemism). Memory: "i'm sorry", flowers, casseroles

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Stipulate

v. to demand or specify in an agreement to make a specific demand in a contract Mr. Wood stipulated his salary during the interview. Memory: "If...then...", splitting up chores

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Scoff

v. to mock at or treat with derision (ridicule;mockery) laugh at someone with contempt and derision She scoffed at him after his pathetic attempts for imploring for help. Memory: three witches (macbeth)

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Alacrity

n. cheerful readiness; briskness done quickly and happily The players got on the field alacrity, excited at the chance to win. Memory: Chick-Fil-A workers, scouts, good service at a restaurant

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Disdain

n. look upon or treat with contempt/scorn. to feel superior to something and treat it as if it is beneath you The adults showed disdain for the toddlers, laughing at how pudgy and awkward they are. Memory: Karens, snobs, looking down your nose

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Belligerent

adj. inclined to war, warlike; out of control and angry. Snoopy is a belligerent dog, often pretednign to be in WWI dog fights. Memory: Hulk, Calvin (and Hobbs), Kanye

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Intimidate

v. to make someone fearful or timid by showing power or making threats The bully intimidated the freshmen by threatening to fight him. Memory: Seniors, bullies

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Feint

n. A deceptive or pretending blow; a fake out; an action taken to fool an opponent He threw a brief feint at the opponent's face, then instead him hi the body. Memory: Head fake, Juke, deke

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Pugnacious

adj. eager and quick to argue, quarrel or fight; The feisty boy was pugnacious, never hesitating to talk back to the teacher Memory: debate team, freshmen, pugs

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Promulgate

v. To make known, to declare, to proclaim People like to promulgate their daily thoughts and activities by posting them on Facebook or Twitter. Memory: "Declare", apology videos

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Brash

adj. Hasty or unthinking; heedless of consequences The brash adventurer bravely crossed the large desert. Memory: fools rush in, Adventurer

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Belittle

v. To speak slightly of; to cause to seem less; to play down, to minimize Don't belittle your skills in something by humbling yourself. Be proud! Memory: bullies, slavery, slandering

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Frenzy

n. A temporary madness. A violent mental or emotional agitation When the school promulgated that the student store was opening up, the students went into a frenzy of anticipation Memory: New movie/game coming out

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Tangible

adj. Perceptiable by touch; touchable. concrete and real; able to be seen and referred to I prefer to read tangible books than ebooks, because I like the way they feel and smell. Memory: Results, Tangerines, books

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Laceration

n. A cut or slash; (typically a serious or deep cut) He received a laceration on his face from the accident. Memory: stab, lashing, mauled by an animal

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Castigate

v. to be reprimanded severely; to subject to severe punishment He was castigated for illegal trafficking and was sent to prision for 10 years. Memory: Drill sergeant, Jail, losing a child while babysitting

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Sordid

adj. Marked by baseness or grossness; undesirable. morally or socially wrong His sordid past has debased most of his humanity. Memory: brown, tabloids, paparazzi, Joker

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Octogenarian

n. A person who is from 80-89 years old an elderly person. The octogenarian got put in the old age home, nursing home, etc. Memory: gray hair, Grandparents, loud TVs

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Solace

n. comfort; alleviation of grief or anxiety She found solace in watching fall leaves tumble off their branches, forgetting about the drudgery of her mundane life, caring for octogenarians. Memory: Chocolate, a nap, comfort food

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Aspirant

n. one who has a strong desire to advance or gain a higher position The aspirant dreamed of attending Harvard, studying for hours each night. Memory: student athletes, promotion, valedictorian

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Dregs

n. The most undesirable parts; the remaining parts; leftovers The lady was last in line to the milkshake store, so she onlyt got the dregs. Memory: the last drips (toothpaste)

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Scurrilous

adj. spreading scandalous claims about someone; scandalous and harmful Jeremy got me fired by telling my boss scurrilous lies about me. Memory: rumors

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Rampant

adj. Vigorous or unrestrained; spreading without control; branching out everywhere The rampant zombies were everywhere that our hero tried to run; there was no escape. Memory: Infestation, overpopulation, diesase

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Inane

adj. Devoid of intelligence, lacking sense or meaning; empty; pointless The inane tweets that Jeremy kept making caused everyone to unfollow or mute him because they were so pointless. Memory: Patrick Star, interviews, small talk

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Ethics

n. A system of moral principles; branch of philosophy dealing with right and wrong In order to decide if someone would think the death penalty is wrong, you first have the understand that person's ethics. Memory: Black and White. milgram experiment

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Concur

v. to agree with; to express agreement openly If you concur, say "Aye". Memory: Aye, Consensus, court opinions

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