knowt logo

Government and Tribal Sovereignty

Government and Tribal Sovereignty

Types of Government

Anarchy

  • No governing body, state of disorder
  • Do not believe in authority and coercive forms of government
  • No source of power
  • Absence of power at national level, at local level coercion is used to take power
  • Example: Craz in Washington

Aristocracy:

  • Ruled by the smaller privileged upper class
  • Passed through generations
  • Originated in Greece
  • Aristotle created it, tends to have honorary titles
  • Source of power is formal authority, power given because of position
  • Example: Britain’s royal family

Communism

  • All property is publicly owned
  • Everyone works and is paid according to their needs and abilities
  • Heavy progressive income tax
  • Source of power is formal authority
  • Example: Cuba – Fidel Castro took over government in 1959, became totally communistic by 1961

Democracy/Republicanism:

  • Governed by the people (directly or through elected representatives)
  • Originated in Athens during 5th century BC
  • Source of power is formal authority, persuasion used for elections
  • Example: The United States of America

Federalism:

  • Two levels of government control the same territory
  • One national and one state/area level
  • Both must be in agreement to make decisions
  • Source of power is formal authority through elected officials, persuasion is used for elections
  • Example: The United States of America

Feudalism:

  • System in Europe in which a lord owned all the land while other people (serfs) farmed the land
  • Source of power is rewards, land in exchange for labor
  • No upward mobility
  • Peasants must pay a tax/fee depending on their amount of labor
  • Example: 12th century England

Kleptocracy:

  • Corrupt leaders take advantage of their power in order to embezzle their country’s funds
  • Gain money through a variety of methods (bribes, special favors, direct government funds to their personal bank accounts)
  • Source of power is coercion and rewards
  • Example: Former Indonesian President Suharto

Monarchy:

  • Absolute Monarchy
  • when the monarch holds unlimited power and is not limited by written laws
  • Often times passed down through hierarchy
  • Source of power is coercion, rewards, and formal authority
  • Symbolic Monarchy
  • No real power (no source)
  • Monarch has no real political power, acts as a symbol
  • Example: Sultan of Brunei, Hassanal Bolkiah
  • Example: England’s monarchy

Oligarchy:

  • Small group of people hold complete power
  • Typically determined by wealth, but can be by other
  • Example: 19th century England

Theocracy:

  • Government led by divine guidance or a group people who are divinely guided
  • Source of power is coercion
  • Example: Iran’s theocratic republic

Totalitarianism:

  • One party control without question, generally small group
  • Controls every part of citizens daily lives
  • Usually has secret police and concentration camps
  • Source of power is formal authority, coercion, and persuasion
  • Examples: Soviet Union, North Korea, Nazi Germany

Military Dictatorship:

  • Dictatorship in which those with military expertise have total political authority
  • Source of power is formal authority, coercion, and expertise
  • Example: Sudan

Tribal Sovereignty Vocab

  • Cede – to give up, usually power or territory.
  • Abrogate – to repeal or rescind, usually a law or agreement.
  • Negotiate – to work something out through discussion.
  • Aboriginal – inhabiting somewhere before the arrival of colonizers; native/indigenous.
  • Sovereign – to have the right to self-govern. When referring to a nation, to act independently.
  • Deplete – to use up resources of or to exhaust.
  • Scarcity – a limit of resources when there is a great need for it.
  • Fiduciary – involving trust, especially relating to the relationship between a trustee and a beneficiary.
  • Trust (Land trust) – an agreement whereby one party (the trustee) agrees to hold ownership of a piece of real property for the benefit of another party (the beneficiary).

Government and Tribal Sovereignty

Types of Government

Anarchy

  • No governing body, state of disorder
  • Do not believe in authority and coercive forms of government
  • No source of power
  • Absence of power at national level, at local level coercion is used to take power
  • Example: Craz in Washington

Aristocracy:

  • Ruled by the smaller privileged upper class
  • Passed through generations
  • Originated in Greece
  • Aristotle created it, tends to have honorary titles
  • Source of power is formal authority, power given because of position
  • Example: Britain’s royal family

Communism

  • All property is publicly owned
  • Everyone works and is paid according to their needs and abilities
  • Heavy progressive income tax
  • Source of power is formal authority
  • Example: Cuba – Fidel Castro took over government in 1959, became totally communistic by 1961

Democracy/Republicanism:

  • Governed by the people (directly or through elected representatives)
  • Originated in Athens during 5th century BC
  • Source of power is formal authority, persuasion used for elections
  • Example: The United States of America

Federalism:

  • Two levels of government control the same territory
  • One national and one state/area level
  • Both must be in agreement to make decisions
  • Source of power is formal authority through elected officials, persuasion is used for elections
  • Example: The United States of America

Feudalism:

  • System in Europe in which a lord owned all the land while other people (serfs) farmed the land
  • Source of power is rewards, land in exchange for labor
  • No upward mobility
  • Peasants must pay a tax/fee depending on their amount of labor
  • Example: 12th century England

Kleptocracy:

  • Corrupt leaders take advantage of their power in order to embezzle their country’s funds
  • Gain money through a variety of methods (bribes, special favors, direct government funds to their personal bank accounts)
  • Source of power is coercion and rewards
  • Example: Former Indonesian President Suharto

Monarchy:

  • Absolute Monarchy
  • when the monarch holds unlimited power and is not limited by written laws
  • Often times passed down through hierarchy
  • Source of power is coercion, rewards, and formal authority
  • Symbolic Monarchy
  • No real power (no source)
  • Monarch has no real political power, acts as a symbol
  • Example: Sultan of Brunei, Hassanal Bolkiah
  • Example: England’s monarchy

Oligarchy:

  • Small group of people hold complete power
  • Typically determined by wealth, but can be by other
  • Example: 19th century England

Theocracy:

  • Government led by divine guidance or a group people who are divinely guided
  • Source of power is coercion
  • Example: Iran’s theocratic republic

Totalitarianism:

  • One party control without question, generally small group
  • Controls every part of citizens daily lives
  • Usually has secret police and concentration camps
  • Source of power is formal authority, coercion, and persuasion
  • Examples: Soviet Union, North Korea, Nazi Germany

Military Dictatorship:

  • Dictatorship in which those with military expertise have total political authority
  • Source of power is formal authority, coercion, and expertise
  • Example: Sudan

Tribal Sovereignty Vocab

  • Cede – to give up, usually power or territory.
  • Abrogate – to repeal or rescind, usually a law or agreement.
  • Negotiate – to work something out through discussion.
  • Aboriginal – inhabiting somewhere before the arrival of colonizers; native/indigenous.
  • Sovereign – to have the right to self-govern. When referring to a nation, to act independently.
  • Deplete – to use up resources of or to exhaust.
  • Scarcity – a limit of resources when there is a great need for it.
  • Fiduciary – involving trust, especially relating to the relationship between a trustee and a beneficiary.
  • Trust (Land trust) – an agreement whereby one party (the trustee) agrees to hold ownership of a piece of real property for the benefit of another party (the beneficiary).